rhubarb-strawberry curd

I’m taking some time off the next few weeks to spend with my family and our new bundle of joy. In the meantime, I’ve set up a few posts ahead of time to share. This rhubarb-strawberry curd — adapted from my eCookbook butters, spreads and glazes guide — is one of them and it’s kind of the best thing ever, if I do say so myself (well, minus this).

I feel like I blinked and summer arrived. Like it was muddy and brown and blah/gross outside, I closed my eyes and when I opened them there were tulips and bright green grass and buds on the trees and birds tweeting about their summer vacation plans (at least that’s what I like to think they’re chirping about).

Needless to say, it’s been a lovely transition. Don’t get me wrong — I do love me some winter (the Christmas-y, magical, twinkly, snow-white, early December portion of it, PEOPLE. Avert your dagger eyes at me!), which is why I proclaim I will always and forever live in the Midwest as long as life allows me. But that seemingly instant change from gross spring to pretty spring is remarkable. It’s literally a breath of fresh air.

rhubarb-strawberry curd

Of course, in addition to all the greenery and chatty birds there is a plethora of seasonal goodness cropping up at the grocery store and farmers markets, like rhubarb and strawberries. I admit that while my love for strawberries runs deep deep deep, it’s only been a few years since I was introduced to rhubarb in the form of my grandma-in-law’s yummy pie (OMG why did I bring that up because now it’s all I can think about) and I haven’t been able to get enough of it ever since. It’s a shame its peak time is so short — but it’s also helped me strengthen my competitiveness at the grocery store against all the other people swarming about the rhubarb. Throw some ‘bows in the name of rhubarb, amiright?? Ahem. I KID.

rhubarb-strawberry curd

Anywho, I haven’t been able to make it to the grocery store in two weeks thanks to a certain little one who has been keeping me so busy I barely have time to brush my teeth (HOTT, I am), so I’m glad I made and froze a generous amount of this rhubarb-strawberry curd before her arrival. Now I can enjoy that coveted rhubarb on biscuits, toast, pancakes, waffles, a spoon, etc. whenever I well please. I feel like patting myself on the back for that think-ahead work.

rhubarb-strawberry curd

rhubarb-strawberry curd

rhubarb-strawberry curd

Homemade curd is one of those things that sounds kind of fancy to make but is actually really simple. The tartness of the rhubarb and the sweetness of the strawberries combined lend themselves oh-so-well to the curd, and bonus! You can use the leftover pulp-stuff as compote for any and all carbs. Double fist pump for that right there.

So, to recap: I blinked, spring is here, rhubarb is my fave and now let’s make curd and eat it on everything. The end.

rhubarb-strawberry curd

Rhubarb-Strawberry Curd
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Yields: 2 cups curd
 
Ingredients
  • 1½ cups chopped fresh or frozen rhubarb
  • 1 ½ cups quartered fresh strawberries
  • ¾ cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, divided
  • 1 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 6 egg yolks
  • Pinch salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cubed
  • Splash of grenadine or maraschino cherry juice, for color (optional)
Directions
  1. In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, combine rhubarb and strawberries with ⅓ cup sugar, 1 tablespoon lemon juice and water. Cook 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until rhubarb falls apart. Remove from heat. Cool completely, then puree in a food processor or blender until smooth. Reserve 1 cup puree.
  2. Fill a medium saucepan halfway with water; set over medium-low heat. When water is close to a simmer, top saucepan with another medium saucepan (to create a double boiler). Add egg yolks, remaining sugar and salt to saucepan; whisk to combine. Add reserved rhubarb puree and continue to cook, whisking constantly, 10 minutes until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the mixture reads 160°F (run your finger along the back of a spoon; if the path remains, it’s ready). Remove from heat; stir in cubed butter and grenadine for color, if desired.
  3. Pour curd into a small bowl; cover top of curd directly with plastic wrap. Chill in refrigerator at least 4 hours to cool and thicken.

Psst — Want more buttery, glaze-y goodness like this? Purchase the full “Quick Bread Love” eCookbook package to get 10 extra recipes of spreadable yums.

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